http://www.makepovertyhistory.org Bloggreen: Is it just me?

Thursday, September 08, 2005

Is it just me?

Or is the youth wages rate just laughable when you compare it to the very similar debate that was held when we abolished gender wage rates? "Why would I hire a woman, when I could get a man for the same rate?"

2 Comments:

At 9/08/2005 10:34:00 PM, Blogger Joe Hendren said...

No it ain't just you - I wholeheartly agree.

I have often wondered whether it would be worth looking at some of the comments of business when women were first entering into the workforce in a large scale (eg during/after WWII). Would they claim women could not be paid as much as men because they 'did not have as much experience' or that 'women would not get jobs?'. And many jobs that were regarded as womens work continue to be underpaid, this is why the 30% settlement for nurses was so important!

'training' is not an excuse for youth rates either - as NZ employment law has always recognised a lower rate may be appropriate on these grounds (I forget the exact wording off hand) - so whats with the blatant age discrimination?

 
At 9/09/2005 10:20:00 PM, Blogger GeorgeDarroch said...

Not that I don't agree with you, but how does this help in putting everybody out of work?

Work is bad! Lets start by abolishing it for under 18's and then progressively phase it out.

On another youth related note, the study so religiously quoted by Anderton about the impacts of the lowered drinking age showed that raising the age back to 20 would save lives. But wouldn't raising it to 22, or say 40, save even more lives? Perhaps only retirees should drink. Yet no-one in the media seems to even have pointed out about the fact that although alcohol is a freedom that comes at a price, it hits all sectors of society. Are the effects worse for under 20's than the 20-25 age group? We haven't been told, and I suspect they have no clue.

Nice to see JA quoting evidence about drug policies when it suits his predetermined positions.


Now,

 

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